Elderly Chinese Mobile User

Top 5 trends International brand should be aware of upon Chinese Social Media in 2014

Western brands that are trying to get to grips with social media in China know that it is a fast paced and often complex arena and, with nearly 600 million users and a year on year growth of over 165% for mobile shopping, it’s something they have to work hard to keep up with.

1. China gets the exercise bug

GarminForERun

Advert for the Garmin Forerunner 220, a wearable smart device. (File photo courtesy of Garmin)

Well into 2014, microblogging platform WeChat are forging into new territory by teaming up with third party vendors to promote smart hardware like fitness bracelets. As with Western users, Chinese netizens are getting the exercise bug, particularly in the more affluent Tier 1 and 2 cities.

According to Want China Times, this month saw “iHealth, Huawei Honor, Lifesense and Codoon put their respective WeChat version of smart bracelets for sale on platforms such as Jingdong Mall (JD.com) after the WeChat team closely worked with these vendors for nearly half a year.”

It may be a sign that WeChat is beginning to collaborate more with third party providers, though they are keeping their cards close to their chest. The integration allows WeChat users to put on their smart bracelets, measure their sporting or exercise performance and then share it with friends on the popularmicroblogging platform.

2 . Search targets “big data” in China

Internet search giant Baidu is thinking about big data as they move into the later parts of 2014. With trillions of web pages in storage and billions of searches conducted every day, Baidu is China’s major search engine, modelled on Google, but perhaps slightly behind in developmental terms. According to Wang Jing, vice president of Engineering: “Baidu hopes to build a big data engine on the massive data the company collected over the years and offer it to traditional businesses.”  

3. Online to offline is getting bigger

Elderly Chinese Mobile User

Elderly Chinese Mobile User (photo from http://www.chinadaily.com.cn)

Online to offline, whereby a mobile or pc is used to order something like a taxi is set to become more popular as offline businesses start to get a slice of the ecommerce pie. Tencent has been leading the way mainly because of its 355 million monthly active users and others may well jump on the band wagon in the future.

4. Chinese companies are becoming more competitive

China’s own companies are beginning to realise the power that can be had from harnessing social media and are starting to become more visible, competing with Western brands who have long been working hard to make China’s various platforms work for them.

According to Econsultancy.com: “The trend in China is towards using social media as a bridge between consumer and company. And as 500m of China’s 618m internet users use a mobile device to access the internet, m-commerce has become even more important.” 

ChinaWorldCupFever

(photo from ChinaDaily.cn)

5. China gets World Cup fever

And finally, although they didn’t have a team in the tournament, China’s netizens have been keeping a close eye on the World Cup this year with interest peaking with around 11 million users including a hashtag in their posts throughout the group stages.

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Online Shopping in China

How Social Media is Changing Online Shopping in China

It used to be that your average netizen in China would hook onto one brand and stay with it… not any more

Lately, though, with the rise of social media platforms like WeChat and Weibo and online shopping through internet giants like Alibaba, greater choice has meant that China’s ever growing online army are more likely to follow several brands.

ChineseOnlineShoppingThe younger generation coming through are also more likely to go for quality products and spend more than older netizens who have grown up through a range of social changes and some difficult economic times. There is more disposable income and greater social freedom now than ever before and it is driving the changing landscape of social media and online shopping.

Social Media is Spreading but the Market is Shrinking for Western Brands

With changing infrastructure and increasing popularity, social media is moving out of the Tier 1 and 2 cities into the rest of this large and complicated country. In 2014, rural areas made up nearly half of netizens and instant messaging is the most popular online pursuit with 530 million active users across all platforms. http://socialmediatoday.com/we-are-social-singapore/2350106/understanding-social-media-china-2014

Online Shopping in ChinaIt’s not all good news for social media marketers working to promote Western brands. According to China Daily: “Amid a sluggish consumer goods market in China, foreign brands are facing pressure, with six out of 10 losing market share to their domestic rivals last year.”

It seems that the domestic market is forging ahead and capturing the attention of netizens. For instance, western soft drinks brands lost a 6.3% share of the market while domestic carbonated brands such as Wahaha “increased market share by 3.8 percent through product innovation and large scale marketing,” according to China Daily. http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/business/2014-07/02/content_17635342.htm

Lower Tier Cities Spend as Much as Higher Ones

The value of rural markets for Western brands is becoming more and more important and, with their greater connectivity, more accessible. In fact, lower tier cities, though having smaller incomes, spend more of their disposable income on online shopping. Brick and mortar stores are also still important to netizens in all areas with over 70% opting to pop into a shop to check out their possible purchase ‘in the flesh’ before buying online.

China is Investing in Infrastructure

The growth of domestic markets that are beginning to compete with high end Western brands has also led to greater investment in infrastructure. After all, if you are selling a lot of products online then you will need adequate storage space.

According to Reuters: “It is estimated that in the next 15 years China will need to invest $2.5 trillion in land and warehouse construction, equating to 2.4 million square metres of storage space.” http://www.marketmechina.com/four-key-facts-e-commerce-china/

Online-Shopper-chinaThere are, of course difference between the consumers you find in lower tier cities and those you find in the more exclusive neighbourhoods of Shanghai. For instance, lower tier netizens are not used to luxury and tend to focus on value for money and functionality. Higher tier consumers are more likely to buy luxury, ego enhancing products to show off to their friends.

But the landscape is changing and it is doing so quickly, and nowhere is this more obvious than with Chinese domestic brands. According to Forbes: “Chinese firms have great ambitions. For many, building their own company into a global brand that’s accepted by consumers in developed economies is a matter of national pride.” http://www.forbes.com/sites/onmarketing/2014/06/30/chinas-future-in-brand-awareness/

Garnier China

How Brands Have to Adapt their Marketing in China

Brands have long been aware that what sells here in the West doesn’t necessarily sell that well in the East and nowhere is this more noticeable than in China.

Often seen as cut off from the rest of the world, the country represents one of the biggest retail markets for brands and succeeding in it is something akin to the Holy Grail.

According to Start Up China: “A 63% majority of international companies operating in China acknowledged that they needed to alter their product specifically for the Chinese market.  In most cases, this does not mean completely creating a new product or service, but rather making small adjustments to better suit Chinese culture and preferences.”

How Taobao got the edge over EBay taobao

A big difference between the West and countries like China is the way things are paid for, something which eBay were slow to take up.

  • Whereas eBay wanted people to pay by credit card, Taobao realised that many Chinese consumers didn’t have them or were worried about paying online. They introduced a way for a buyer to pay for a product in cash when it was delivered to the door.
  • EBay required sellers to pay for listing a product whereas Taobao decided to make its money from advertising revenue.
  • EBay didn’t particularly like that customer and seller would bargain on the price privately and so didn’t add a chat feature. Taobao accepted that the Chinese way is to haggle over the price and was happy to include a chat function that allowed this to happen.

Localisation is the key

According to Forbes, marketers make the mistake of treating China as one big market: “Treating China as a single market is a flawed concept – it’s 29 different provinces with their own peoples, dialects, customs and brand preferences. Procter & Gamble was one of the few U.S. marketers to realize this early on, investing extensively in proprietary research across multiple cities.”

Garnier ChinaNot only that, but social marketers have to deal with a whole swathe of localised digital platforms such as Weibo and WeChat. China’s social media landscape is vast and complex and choosing the right platform is integral to brand success particularly considering that there are around 500 million netizens and the number is growing.

Beware of bad translation

Many brands, both big and small have fallen foul of poor or ill advised translations of their products and key messages. When Pepsi first ventured into the market its slogan “Pepsi brings you back to life” translated to the Chinese public as “Pepsi brings your ancestors back from the grave” and KFC entered with “Finger licking good” which got translated as “eat your fingers off”.

In truth, many large brands have failed to do the research needed into the culture and customs of their target audience when moving their product into another country.

According to Mike Fromowitz of Ethnicity Multicultural Marketing and Advertising Inc.: “Many international companies have had problems with expanding their brands worldwide because they have failed to put in the research and effort necessary to understand the culture. This has led to several failed brands, to offended consumers, and to the loss of millions of dollars that comes with having to start all over again.”